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The Cost of Nuclear Weapons in the Interest of National Security

By   1 week ago

By Katherine Youssouf on September 15, 2017 Restricting the Means & Methods of Warfare In 1863, Russian military authorities developed an explosive rifle bullet that detonated upon contact. These bullets, originally developed to destroy ammunition wagons, caused wounds far greater than those needed to overcome an enemy. As a result, Russian Emperor Alexander II convened a […]

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2017 Spring NSLB Symposium: Cyber Space and Hacking; Meeting the Challenges of the Digital Age

By   7 months ago

Register for our Spring Symposium here: https://www.wcl.american.edu/secle/registration March 1st, from 1-5pm

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Coming Home Again: Prisoner Release in Light of the Geneva Convention

By   10 months ago

By Kara Kozikowski   The face of warfare in the past century has been nothing if not ever evolving. Throughout the past hundred years, armed conflicts have taken a more modern and more irregular form, and the issues that arise from them may not be matters that are easily resolved in the laws of war […]

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Punitive Strikes, Keeping the Seas Safe

By   10 months ago

  By Prescott Heighton Freedom of the seas and their safe navigation has been a fundamental principle of American international relations since the nation’s inception. It ensures the ability of American merchants to access markets overseas, thus helping secure our economy, and ultimately provide security and stability for the nation. The Quasi-War and the Barbary […]

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Sunset Provisions: Providing Parameters for the Use of Military Force

By   10 months ago

By Anthony Bjelke A recent article in The New Yorker examined the difficulties associated with defining America’s War on Drugs. As a preamble to its examination of the topic, it stated: “The United States has declared war on cancer, on pornography and on terror, and the lesson to be gleaned from those campaigns is that, […]

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    News & Events View All →

    The Cost of Nuclear Weapons in the Interest of National Security

    By   1 week ago

    By Katherine Youssouf on September 15, 2017 Restricting the Means & Methods of Warfare In 1863, Russian military authorities developed an explosive rifle bullet that detonated upon contact. These bullets, originally developed to destroy ammunition wagons, caused wounds far greater than those needed to overcome an enemy. As a result, Russian Emperor Alexander II convened a […]

    Read More →

    2017 Spring NSLB Symposium: Cyber Space and Hacking; Meeting the Challenges of the Digital Age

    By   7 months ago

    Register for our Spring Symposium here: https://www.wcl.american.edu/secle/registration March 1st, from 1-5pm

    Read More →

    Cuba Isn’t Worth the Headache. But See Colombia.

    By   1 year ago

    When ‘Cuba’ and ‘national security’ are mentioned in the same sentence, they tend to be followed by phrases like ‘refugee wave,’ ‘Marxist revolutionaries’ and ‘missile crisis.’ The steps towards normalization of relations with the old Communist foe have caused reactions as varied as the embargo is old, but the ship has set sail and Americans […]

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    Loudspeakers: The Winning Strategy Against North Korea? Part II

    By   1 year ago

    Beginning of this year, South Korea and North Korea began shouting at each other again. It was just last August when the escalated tension between two divided nations came to a halt. Then on January 6, North Korea conducted an underground nuclear test at Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site, causing tension between the two Koreas. The […]

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    Donald Trump, Illegal Orders, and the Law of Armed Conflict

    By   1 year ago

    During the course of the current Republican Primary campaign, Donald Trump has made a number of jarring comments regarding American armed forces and the actions he would take as president. At a rally in Columbus, Ohio, Trump said that he approves not only of waterboarding, but also that he would bring back “a hell of […]

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      National Security Law View All →

      The Cost of Nuclear Weapons in the Interest of National Security

      By   1 week ago

      By Katherine Youssouf on September 15, 2017 Restricting the Means & Methods of Warfare In 1863, Russian military authorities developed an explosive rifle bullet that detonated upon contact. These bullets, originally developed to destroy ammunition wagons, caused wounds far greater than those needed to overcome an enemy. As a result, Russian Emperor Alexander II convened a […]

      Read More →

      2017 Spring NSLB Symposium: Cyber Space and Hacking; Meeting the Challenges of the Digital Age

      By   7 months ago

      Register for our Spring Symposium here: https://www.wcl.american.edu/secle/registration March 1st, from 1-5pm

      Read More →

      No Predictability, No Peace!

      By   9 months ago

      By Ciprian Ivanof The risk of public disorder demands a re-evaluation of the legal framework National Guard forces and the public trust rely on. We live in an age of political uncertainty, violence, and a resulting deep need for predictability. One way we seek to address such things is with model state codes. Model State […]

      Read More →

      Coming Home Again: Prisoner Release in Light of the Geneva Convention

      By   10 months ago

      By Kara Kozikowski   The face of warfare in the past century has been nothing if not ever evolving. Throughout the past hundred years, armed conflicts have taken a more modern and more irregular form, and the issues that arise from them may not be matters that are easily resolved in the laws of war […]

      Read More →

      Sunset Provisions: Providing Parameters for the Use of Military Force

      By   10 months ago

      By Anthony Bjelke A recent article in The New Yorker examined the difficulties associated with defining America’s War on Drugs. As a preamble to its examination of the topic, it stated: “The United States has declared war on cancer, on pornography and on terror, and the lesson to be gleaned from those campaigns is that, […]

      Read More →

        International Law View All →

        The Cost of Nuclear Weapons in the Interest of National Security

        By   1 week ago

        By Katherine Youssouf on September 15, 2017 Restricting the Means & Methods of Warfare In 1863, Russian military authorities developed an explosive rifle bullet that detonated upon contact. These bullets, originally developed to destroy ammunition wagons, caused wounds far greater than those needed to overcome an enemy. As a result, Russian Emperor Alexander II convened a […]

        Read More →

        Coming Home Again: Prisoner Release in Light of the Geneva Convention

        By   10 months ago

        By Kara Kozikowski   The face of warfare in the past century has been nothing if not ever evolving. Throughout the past hundred years, armed conflicts have taken a more modern and more irregular form, and the issues that arise from them may not be matters that are easily resolved in the laws of war […]

        Read More →

        Punitive Strikes, Keeping the Seas Safe

        By   10 months ago

          By Prescott Heighton Freedom of the seas and their safe navigation has been a fundamental principle of American international relations since the nation’s inception. It ensures the ability of American merchants to access markets overseas, thus helping secure our economy, and ultimately provide security and stability for the nation. The Quasi-War and the Barbary […]

        Read More →

        Sadly, Trump Could Use Executive Authority to Ban Muslims from Entering U.S.

        By   10 months ago

        By Joshua Arons In a disappointing turn of events, Donald Trump, the recently elected President of the United States could ban Muslims or people from terror ridden countries from entering our country through invoking a provision of the  1952 Immigration and Nationality Act.  Provision 212 (f) of this Act holds that whenever the President finds […]

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        Fundamental National Security Flaw in U.S.-Cuba Relations

        By   11 months ago

        The U.S. and Cuba may have a lot in common, yet there is still a critical need to learn from their divergent legal and operational systems for security cooperation.

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          Cybersecurity View All →

          The Intersection of “Internet Terrorism” and “Individual Privacy” in the Context of the First Amendment

          By   1 year ago

          “Deterring Russia, channeling growing Chinese power, and working with others to dismantle the Islamic State are daunting challenges — but not greater than rebuilding post-World War II Europe, containing the Soviet Union, ending the Cold War, and promoting democratic governance throughout much of the modern world.”[1] –James Dobbins The “modern world” that Ambassador James Dobbins speaks of has a […]

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          The Slippery Slope of Creating an iPhone Backdoor

          By   1 year ago

          By Gregory Coutros The FBI’s request that Apple provide an electronic backdoor into the iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooters is, on its face, a reasonable request. The government’s need to access the phone is undoubtedly important for national security so as to protect against terrorist attacks similar to the San Bernardino shooting. The […]

          Read More →

          Backdoors: National Security versus the Fourth Amendment

          By   2 years ago

          As citizens of the United States, we rely on our nation’s foundation of rights as defined by the Constitution. These fundamental rights are guaranteed us, and these rights are protected and enforced by our Government – but what happens when it is the Government that is testing the boundaries of one of those rights, namely, […]

          Read More →

          The White House’s Cybersecurity National Action Plan and What it Could Mean to the States

          By   2 years ago

          President Obama recently released the White House’s Cybersecurity National Action Plan (CNAP) last Tuesday.[1] After a hacker released a statement last Monday that he is planning to dump thousands of FBI and DHS employee details[2], the release of the CNAP comes none too soon. The President’s plan outlines the formation of a new commission, a […]

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          iConstitution: How Apple is using the Constitution as a basis for its argument against the FBI

          By   2 years ago

          It’s quite difficult to imagine exactly what the Framers of the Constitution would think of the construal of their document to protect the locked-away iMessages and data of the San Bernardino terrorists. Yet, the principles of the Constitution that Apple is using to rebut the arguments of the FBI protect the rights of the individual […]

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            Counterterrorism View All →

            Sunset Provisions: Providing Parameters for the Use of Military Force

            By   10 months ago

            By Anthony Bjelke A recent article in The New Yorker examined the difficulties associated with defining America’s War on Drugs. As a preamble to its examination of the topic, it stated: “The United States has declared war on cancer, on pornography and on terror, and the lesson to be gleaned from those campaigns is that, […]

            Read More →

            The Implications of the Federal Definition of Domestic Terrorism

            By   10 months ago

            By Natalie Holland On June 17, 2015, Dylann Roof attacked the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, North Carolina where he shot and killed nine people with the intention of provoking a race war. Later that year, on December 2, 2015, Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik shot and killed 14 people and seriously […]

            Read More →

            Difficulties in Prosecuting Islamic State Members Under International Law

            By   1 year ago

            Since its emergence in 2013, The Islamic State has used increasingly violent tactics in an attempt to establish a worldwide caliphate.[i] The Islamic State is accused of committing crimes of unspeakable cruelty including mass executions, sexual slavery, rape and other forms of sexual and gender-based violence, torture, mutilation, enlistment and forced recruitment of children, and […]

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            The Slippery Slope of Creating an iPhone Backdoor

            By   1 year ago

            By Gregory Coutros The FBI’s request that Apple provide an electronic backdoor into the iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooters is, on its face, a reasonable request. The government’s need to access the phone is undoubtedly important for national security so as to protect against terrorist attacks similar to the San Bernardino shooting. The […]

            Read More →

            Backdoors: National Security versus the Fourth Amendment

            By   2 years ago

            As citizens of the United States, we rely on our nation’s foundation of rights as defined by the Constitution. These fundamental rights are guaranteed us, and these rights are protected and enforced by our Government – but what happens when it is the Government that is testing the boundaries of one of those rights, namely, […]

            Read More →

              Experts View All →

              2017 Spring NSLB Symposium: Cyber Space and Hacking; Meeting the Challenges of the Digital Age

              By   7 months ago

              Register for our Spring Symposium here: https://www.wcl.american.edu/secle/registration March 1st, from 1-5pm

              Read More →

              The Third Party Records Doctrine in the Digital Age

              By   2 years ago

              In 2013, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s concurring opinion in United States v. Jones received effusive media coverage.[1] In Jones, the Court held that the Government’s installation of a GPS device on a vehicle, and its use of that device to monitor the movements of the vehicle, constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment.[2] Associate Justice […]

              Read More →

              Fall 2014 Symposium – 2001/2 AUMF and ISIS

              By   3 years ago

              Please join the National Security Law Brief and a panel of experts on Thursday, November 20, 2014 from 2:00 – 6:00 pm for an in depth discussion of the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for Use of Military Force and how they relate to the current operations against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.  Featuring […]

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              Fall Symposium – 2001/2 AUMF and ISIS

              By   3 years ago

              Please join the National Security Law Brief and a panel of experts on Thursday, November 20, 2014 from 2:00 – 6:00 pm for an in depth discussion of the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for Use of Military Force and how they relate to the current operations against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.  Featuring […]

              Read More →

              NSLB's 2014 Spring Symposium: Understanding the Global Implications of the N.S.A. Disclosures on the U.S. Technology Industry

              By   3 years ago

              Understanding the Global Implications of the N.S.A. Disclosures on the U.S. Technology Industry Monday, April 7, 2014 – 3:00 to 5:00 PM followed by a reception from 5:00 to 6:00 PM Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center – 901 K Street NW (11th Floor) Washington, DC brought to you by the National Security Law Brief, American University Washington […]

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                Trending Topics View All →

                Punitive Strikes, Keeping the Seas Safe

                By   10 months ago

                  By Prescott Heighton Freedom of the seas and their safe navigation has been a fundamental principle of American international relations since the nation’s inception. It ensures the ability of American merchants to access markets overseas, thus helping secure our economy, and ultimately provide security and stability for the nation. The Quasi-War and the Barbary […]

                Read More →

                The Implications of the Federal Definition of Domestic Terrorism

                By   10 months ago

                By Natalie Holland On June 17, 2015, Dylann Roof attacked the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, North Carolina where he shot and killed nine people with the intention of provoking a race war. Later that year, on December 2, 2015, Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik shot and killed 14 people and seriously […]

                Read More →

                Sadly, Trump Could Use Executive Authority to Ban Muslims from Entering U.S.

                By   10 months ago

                By Joshua Arons In a disappointing turn of events, Donald Trump, the recently elected President of the United States could ban Muslims or people from terror ridden countries from entering our country through invoking a provision of the  1952 Immigration and Nationality Act.  Provision 212 (f) of this Act holds that whenever the President finds […]

                Read More →

                United States Sanctions on Iran after the Nuclear Deal

                By   1 year ago

                The Iran Nuclear Arms Deal is a landmark, but this deal has been heavily criticized due to the United States economic penalties toward Iran. The circumstances in Iran has put the United States in a difficult situation as they have had to rely on sanctions to deter Iranian actions, but Iran has complied with the […]

                Read More →

                The Slippery Slope of Creating an iPhone Backdoor

                By   1 year ago

                By Gregory Coutros The FBI’s request that Apple provide an electronic backdoor into the iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooters is, on its face, a reasonable request. The government’s need to access the phone is undoubtedly important for national security so as to protect against terrorist attacks similar to the San Bernardino shooting. The […]

                Read More →