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The (Short)cut is the Deepest: The Implications of IP Theft on National Security

By   /  February 25, 2015  /  IP  /  No Comments

Airplanes.  Radios.  Cell phones. What do these three technologies all have in common?  They were all developed and produced within the private sector but have proven indispensable to the government and military in protecting the nation.  It is important not to underestimate the importance that innovation has on a nation’s strength and power.  Imagine the […]

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UK's New Counter-Terrorism and Security Act: How Far is Too Far?

By   /  February 24, 2015  /  National Security Law  /  No Comments

On February 8, 2015, the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act of 2015 (“Act”), the United Kingdom’s newest anti-terrorism legislation, received royal assent.[1] The controversial Act consists of seven parts addressing relevant anti-terrorism concerns in the UK, including: temporary restrictions on travel; terrorism prevention and investigation measures; data retention; aviation, shipping and rail; risk of being drawn […]

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The AUMF Draft Notes – President Promises to Eat His Broccoli

By   /  February 21, 2015  /  AUMF, Global War on Terror, National Security Law, National Security Law & Policy, Trending Topics  /  No Comments

For months, national security law experts have quietly and not–so–quietly complained that the President’s legal rationale to conduct operations against the Islamic State was rather flimsy.  Based largely on an “outdated” 2001 AUMF, the President claimed the authority to conduct operations against ISIL, an organization that had publicly split from al Qaeda.  So naturally, these critics were […]

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Defining Freedom of Speech in an Age of Extremism

By   /  February 19, 2015  /  Trending Topics  /  No Comments

The Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack presents a new challenge to defining free speech in the United States in such a way that protects the right of expression while safeguarding the security of citizens. The Charlie Hebdo attack underscored the propensity of religious extremists to carry out acts of violence when they believe their religion has […]

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‘Roving Patrol’ Abuses and the Demand for Transparency: The ACLU and its FOIA Request to the DHS and CBP

By   /  February 17, 2015  /  Fourth Amendment, National Security Law, National Security Law & Policy, News & Events, Pending Cases  /  No Comments

On February 10, 2015, the American Civil Liberties Union of San Diego and Imperial Counties (ACLU-SDIC) filed a lawsuit against the United States Border Patrol in order to elicit the organization’s records from June 2011 through February of 2015.  The lawsuit charges that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and United States Customs and Border […]

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