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The Department of Justice’s Role as a Deterrent Against Foreign Hackers

By   /  October 27, 2015  /  Cybersecurity, Cybersecurity Law & Policy  /  No Comments

On September 10, 2015, James Clapper, the Director of National Intelligence, briefed the House Intelligence Committee on the array of cyber threats facing the United States. Clapper stated that he was less concerned about the possibility of a large scale cyber event than the increasing number of low-level attacks that compromise U.S. national security and […]

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The Expansion of Japan's Military Presence

By   /  October 18, 2015  /  International Law, National Security Law  /  No Comments

As the modern world presents ever-pressing security concerns for Japan, it has become increasingly necessary for the island nation to shed its seventy-year-old pacifistic doctrine and foster military capabilities of its own. To this end, the Japanese government now seeks to reinvent its stance on its military involvement on the global stage. Japan has not had a formal standing military since […]

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Implications of the Criminal Jurisdiction Article of the Visiting Forces Agreement between the United States and the Philippines

By   /  October 18, 2015  /  International Law, News & Events  /  No Comments

The relationship between the United States and the Philippines spans centuries. Initially a colony turned commonwealth of the United States, the Philippines gained independence in 1946, but a number of American military bases were still maintained until 1991.[1] In the late 1990s, the countries signed a Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA), detailing the nature of military […]

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Targeted Killings: The Blurry Lines of Applicable Legal Frameworks in the Context of Global Terrorism

By   /  October 18, 2015  /  AUMF, Counterterrorism, Global War on Terror, International Law, Laws of War / International Humanitarian Law, Remote Targeting  /  No Comments

Is it legal to use Uninhabited Aircraft Systems (UAS) technology to target and kill people suspected of terrorist activities? The short answer: it depends. The ever-expanding technology used in combat, married with the transnational arena in which wars are now waged has compelled lawmakers to reconsider traditional customs and laws that govern war. The interplay […]

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Insecurity in General Aviation

By   /  October 12, 2015  /  National Security Law, News & Events  /  No Comments

Presently, there are vulnerabilities within general aviation that terrors can exploit.[1]  Shockingly, little has been done since the 9/11 attacks to improve security to general aviation.[2]  In fact, most security programs implemented by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) are voluntary.[3]  Unfortunately, implementing a universal program that provides significant improvements to general aviation security is too […]

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