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Could Qaddafi’s downfall be the last nail in the coffin for the War Powers Resolution?

By   /  August 17, 2016  /  Analysis, International, National Security Law  /  No Comments

As negotiations continue for the surrender of the few cities where deposed tyrant Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi could be hiding, how peaceful the endgame turns out to be may impact the rhetoric surrounding President Obama’s decision to enter the fray in the first place. Part of that discussion will undoubtedly concern the War Powers Resolution (“WPR”), […]

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The Third Party Records Doctrine and Privacy in the Digital Age and Its Role in National Security

By   /  April 30, 2016  /  Analysis, Cyber-terrorism/Finance/Other, National Security Law  /  No Comments

Everyday that passes the expectation of privacy of individuals diminishes. The newest technological crazes revolve around monitoring our day-to-day activities and maximizing every second we have. From wristwatches that measure your heart rate and let you read email or text messages at the same time, to smart meters installed at our houses collecting minute-by-minute data […]

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Supreme Court Approves Change to Rule 41 Search and Seizure Warrants for Electronic Property

By   /  April 29, 2016  /  Analysis, National Security Law  /  No Comments

On Thursday, April 28, Chief Justice John Roberts submitted to Congress, the amendments to the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure that have been adopted by the Supreme Court.[1] The Supreme Court amended Rule 41(b), governing ‘Search and Seizure’ by expanding the scope of venue in which a warrant could apply.[2] Under certain circumstances, a federal […]

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Cuba Isn’t Worth the Headache. But See Colombia.

By   /  April 29, 2016  /  International, News, News & Events  /  No Comments

When ‘Cuba’ and ‘national security’ are mentioned in the same sentence, they tend to be followed by phrases like ‘refugee wave,’ ‘Marxist revolutionaries’ and ‘missile crisis.’ The steps towards normalization of relations with the old Communist foe have caused reactions as varied as the embargo is old, but the ship has set sail and Americans […]

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Difficulties in Prosecuting Islamic State Members Under International Law

By   /  April 28, 2016  /  International, Terrorist Trials  /  No Comments

Since its emergence in 2013, The Islamic State has used increasingly violent tactics in an attempt to establish a worldwide caliphate.[i] The Islamic State is accused of committing crimes of unspeakable cruelty including mass executions, sexual slavery, rape and other forms of sexual and gender-based violence, torture, mutilation, enlistment and forced recruitment of children, and […]

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