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Can Pre-Trial Agreements Satiate Indefinite Detention Concerns?

By   /  August 15, 2012  /  National Security Law  /  No Comments

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A New Age: The Need for Terrorism Legislation to Keep Pace With the Future of Cyber Warfare

By   /  July 26, 2012  /  National Security Law  /  No Comments

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) suffered the most comprehensive and destructive security breach of military computers in recent history.[] It began with a virus that was uploaded to a computer at a Mid dle East military base and quickly spread throughout the network of the U.S. Central Command, amounting to what security […]

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The Rise and Relevance of Economic Espionage

By   /  April 4, 2012  /  National Security Law  /  No Comments

The Economic Espionage Act (EEA) of 1996 was passed in response to the threat and subsequent success of foreign nations accessing U.S. trade secrets and exploiting them to the detriment of American economic and national security interests. Although it seems at best tangential to conventional notions of “National Security,” economic espionage should at the forefront […]

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Mohamed v. Jeppesen DataPlan and the New Documents on Private Companies' Involvement in Rendition

By   /  September 7, 2011  /  National Security Law  /  No Comments

When “even the most compelling necessity cannot overcome the claim of privilege if the court is ultimately satisfied that [state] secrets are at stake,” what happens when the relevant documents become public? Rendition suits have become a hot topic since 9/11 and with the continued challenges to the practices of the United States Government, it […]

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Could Qaddafi's downfall be the last nail in the coffin for the War Powers Resolution?

By   /  September 5, 2011  /  National Security Law  /  Comments Off on Could Qaddafi's downfall be the last nail in the coffin for the War Powers Resolution?

As negotiations continue for the surrender of the few cities where deposed tyrant Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi could be hiding, how peaceful the endgame turns out to be may impact the rhetoric surrounding President Obama’s decision to enter the fray in the first place. Part of that discussion will undoubtedly concern the War Powers Resolution (“WPR”), the […]

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