Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  National Security Law  >  Secrecy
Latest

Spying for Security or Spying because of Habit?

By   /  November 17, 2013  /  Counterterrorism, Cyber-surveillance, Cybersecurity, Cybersecurity Law & Policy, First Amendment, Intelligence, National Security Law, Secrecy, Surveillance, Trending Topics  /  No Comments

Pulitzer Prize winning journalists Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman recently wrote an AP article stating that continued spying on mosques in New York City has not proven to hinder any threats to national security. According to Apuzzo and Goldman, the New York Police Department has continued to spy on mosques throughout New York City and […]

Read More →
Latest

Keep Your Friends Close . . .

By   /  November 11, 2013  /  Big Data, Cyber-surveillance, Cybersecurity, Cybersecurity Law & Policy, Foreign Relations, Intelligence, International Law, International Security, National Security Law, National Security Law & Policy, Secrecy, Surveillance, Trending Topics  /  No Comments

The recent media circus surrounding the leaking of classified information concerning our National Security Agency (NSA) cell phone monitoring programs by Edward Snowden, former NSA contractor, has shed much light but little clarity.  While the existence of the program is without question, the criteria for inclusion are seen as overly broad . . . everyone. […]

Read More →
Latest

Legal Fight Over Release of Bin Laden Photos Won't Die

By   /  March 22, 2013  /  Featured, Global War on Terror, Pending Cases, Secrecy  /  No Comments

Audiences of “Zero Dark Thirty,” an Oscar-nominated film about the decade-long hunt for Osama bin Laden and the May 2011 operation by U.S. special forces that led to his death at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, witnessed a scene in the movie that depicted soldiers who conducted the raid snapping digital photographs of the terrorist’s […]

Read More →
Latest

Polygraphs, Pertinent or Pernicious?

By   /  December 13, 2012  /  Fifth Amendment, Intelligence, National Security Law, National Security Law & Policy, Secrecy  /  No Comments

Last year more than 73,000 Americans underwent a polygraph examination in an effort to obtain or keep their job with the federal government, yet, according to models created by the National Academies, there may be thousands of people who are identified as lying during their polygraph examinations when they are in fact being entirely truthful. Applicants […]

Read More →
Latest

Why Palestinian Statehood is a Question for the U.N.

By   /  September 22, 2011  /  Experts, Featured, Foreign Relations, International Law, International Security, Secrecy  /  No Comments

As the Palestinians seek U.N. support for a state of their own, Washington has advanced two arguments to dissuade them: first, that taking the issue of statehood to the United Nations is a unilateral move away from negotiations with Israel; and second, that the effort will be counterproductive because the United States will veto any […]

Read More →