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Coming Home Again: Prisoner Release in Light of the Geneva Convention

By   /  December 3, 2016  /  Featured, International Law, Laws of War / International Humanitarian Law, Torture  /  Comments Off on Coming Home Again: Prisoner Release in Light of the Geneva Convention

By Kara Kozikowski   The face of warfare in the past century has been nothing if not ever evolving. Throughout the past hundred years, armed conflicts have taken a more modern and more irregular form, and the issues that arise from them may not be matters that are easily resolved in the laws of war […]

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President-elect Trump’s Road to Reviving Enhanced Interrogation Techniques (EIT)

By   /  November 22, 2016  /  National Security Law, Torture  /  Comments Off on President-elect Trump’s Road to Reviving Enhanced Interrogation Techniques (EIT)

By Ian Jones-Muniz Over the course of Donald Trump’s campaign, the President-elect has made clear that he intends to revive Bush-era enhanced interrogation techniques (EIT), widely labeled as torture. Specifically, Mr. Trump has touted support for waterboarding, stated “torture works” (EIT advocates specifically avoid the term ‘torture’ as it is an unequivocal violation of domestic […]

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Medical Experimentation on Detainees

By   /  June 11, 2010  /  News & Events, Torture, Trending Topics  /  No Comments

In a review of The Torture Papers—a collection of investigations by Physicians for Human Rights (PHR)—Professor Steven Vladeck says that medical personnel’s involvement in the interrogation of CIA detainees might have been of the nature of experimentation. The report purports that doctors could have been used as a legal shield—that the DOJ Office of Legal […]

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Appeals Court Rejects Suit in Arar Rendition Case

By   /  November 12, 2009  /  Experts, Torture  /  No Comments

  The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, delivered a ruling on November 2, 2009, holding that Mr. Arar cannot seek civil damages from federal government officials because Congress has not authorized damages for a violation of the Torture Victim Protection Act. The Court declined to allow a Bivens action against federal […]

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