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Establishing A Legal Framework to Hold Private Security Contractors Accountable

By   /  February 7, 2013  /  Featured, International Law, Laws of War / International Humanitarian Law, National Security Law, National Security Law & Policy, UCMJ  /  No Comments

Ever since the Vietnam War, the US has increasingly relied on private contractors to support overseas military efforts. Private contractors are hired by a variety of military and federal agencies to assist with logistics, military personnel services, and security operations and are seen by many, especially the populations of the countries they are operating in, […]

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CEJA: An Attempt to Clarify Federal Jurisdiction for Civilian Contractors who Commit Crimes Overseas

By   /  December 25, 2012  /  Laws of War / International Humanitarian Law, UCMJ  /  No Comments

The general rule is that contractors protect and mercenaries fight. Usually, contractors are not trained by their companies. Most have military backgrounds. They must meet a contract requirement before the United States can train them. Contractors working with the U.S. military are designated as noncombatants who have no combat immunity under international law if they […]

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The Necessity of a Federal Law for the Prosecution of Foreign Combatants

By   /  December 21, 2012  /  Counterterrorism, Global War on Terror, International Law, Laws of War / International Humanitarian Law, National Security Law, National Security Law & Policy, Terrorist Trials, Trending Topics, UCMJ  /  No Comments

The trend of warfare in the last century speaks to future conflicts continuing to be less traditional and involving questions that are perhaps not adequately addressed by the Geneva Conventions and the laws of war. Two such questions, how to detain non-state fighters and how to prosecute them, are already being grappled with in the […]

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